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Cornell Fruit Resources

Resources for Commercial Growers

Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD)

Genus species: Drosophila suzukii

The spotted wing Drosophila (SWD) is a vinegar or fruit fly of East Asian origin. It made its way into New York by 2011. Today, it has spread throughout most of the continental US. It can directly infest the fruit of many plants, but is most attracted to raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, and other late-season, soft-flesh fruits — cultivated and wild.

SWD deserves notice because, unlike her relatives, which lay eggs on over-ripe or rotting fruit, she can lay eggs inside fresh fruit, often before harvest. After only a few days, the fruit skin becomes dimpled or wrinkled, forming craters in the fruit. Without control measures, late season raspberries, blackberries and blueberries can suffer upwards of 80% crop loss.

Cornell University is coordinating SWD monitoring in NY. A map of current findings is found on the Distribution maps page and the SWD blog reports where it is being caught.

Crops of concern and wild hosts

Monitoring

Identification

Management

Distribution maps

Economic and environmental impact

Biology and life cycle


SWD Resources:


 


Spotted Wing Drosophila Blog:


Latest posts:

  • Early spring food for pollinators
    Native, non-weedy, shrub willow blooms in early spring, a time that is critical for pollinators because of the low availability of food sources.  Shrub willow supports a large diversity of pollinators that feed on its abundant pollen.  Research has shown that wild bees can be an important component of crop pollination.  Also, diversified landscapes that []
  • Hummingbirds may reduce SWD
    Research in raspberries at Cornell AgriTech over the last four years has shown promise as an alternative tactic to reduce the impact of SWD on berries. As described in a previous blog posted in 2014, Hummingbirds, these birds may indeed enjoy eating SWD. Preliminary data analysis for 2018 shows that when SWD numbers are very low []
  • Spotted lanternfly found in two counties in NY
    The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private []
  • Use salt flotation to check for SWD
    Effective use of salt flotation will help you determine if your fruit are infested with SWD and if your spray program is working. It also will give you a perspective on what your customers may find when they take the fruit home to eat fresh or to make pies, jellies, jams and preserves. I learned that variations []
  • SWD Monitoring Completed for 2018
    As of August 9, 2018, all 35 SWD trapping sites have sustained catch of SWD in the 23 counties in New York where monitoring was taking place. First trap catch across the New York State network spanned 72 days, from May 22 (Erie County) to August 2 (Herkimer County). All sites used the Scentry trap []
  • Hummingbirds to control SWD – Workshop
    This Wednesday! Using Hummingbirds to Help Control SWD — a twilight meeting in Salem, NY hosted by Laura McDermott, Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program (ENYCHP). Biological and cultural controls of SWD are possible! Now that SWD numbers are increasing, every tactic used will help protect your late season berries. Come learn about ongoing research into encouraging []
  • Sustained catch in Herkimer County
    As expected this late into the summer season, SWD was caught a second week in a row at a blueberry farm in Herkimer County.  7 males were caught in the traps set in and around the blueberry field, during the week ending August 9, 2018. These traps are being monitored by Bernie Armata, Herkimer County []

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